Difference between revisions of "Tailored and Alternative Learning Systems"

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<h2>Description</h2>
 
<h2>Description</h2>
Tailored and Alternative Learning systems and ideologies have a long history. "Tailored learning" systems probably date back to the advent of vocations, and "Alternative Education" has probably been with us as long as standard education systems. However, trends in these areas over the past century, and more recently over the past decade are notable in their increasing impact on standard educational systems.  These influences have been largely driven by scientists (physicians, psychologists, computer scientists) researching and becoming involved in education. <br>
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Tailored and Alternative Learning systems and ideologies have a long history. "Tailored learning" systems probably date back to the advent of vocations, and "Alternative Education" has probably been with us as long as standard education systems. However, trends in these areas over the past century, and more recently over the past decade are notable in their increasing impact on standard educational systems.  These influences have been largely driven by scientists (physicians, psychologists, computer scientists) researching and becoming involved in education.  
  
Jean Piaget , a Swiss researcher has
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Swiss researcher Jean Piaget [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Piaget#Origins] Later in the 90's, Alan Kay was inspired by Piaget's theories in developing his Dynabook programming system, which bears a striking resemblance to today's modern tablet computer (and beyond). Inspired by Piaget, Italian physician and educator Maria Montessouri emphasized the impact of childrens' environment and value of play and natural development in education. Her methods have been adopted widely in modern alternative educational systems today, particularly in the West.  
 
 
Inspired by Piaget, Italian physician and educator Maria Montessouri emphasized the impact of childrens' environment and value of play and natural development in education. Her methods have been adopted widely in modern alternative educational systems, particularly in the West.  
 
  
 
<h2>Enablers</h2>
 
<h2>Enablers</h2>
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<h2>Inhibitors</h2>
 
<h2>Inhibitors</h2>
1. Resistance to change in the educational system<br>
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1. Resistance to change in the educational system <br>
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The OECD considers overcoming resistance to change in educational policies among its central challenges [http://www.oecd.org/document/34/0,3343,en_2649_37455_43880354_1_1_1_1,00.html]
  
 
<h2>Paradigm</h2>
 
<h2>Paradigm</h2>
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<h2>Timing</h2>
 
<h2>Timing</h2>
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The origins of many modern century alternative school movements are three European philosopher/educators: Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, and Friedrich Froebel. In his 1762 book Emile, Rousseau argued that education should follow the child's natural growth rather than the demands of society. During the late 60s/early 70s in the US, educators were experimenting with alternative education in the US. However, over the past 20 years, more traditional educational models have been dominant. The 1983 report by President Reagan's Commission on Excellence in Education, A Nation at Risk has brought about a high degree of emphasis on standards a push back to traditional educational models. Interest in alternative education is beginning to re-emerge due to a growing recognition that in today's democratic, information-rich society, learning should take place everywhere, and diverse personal interests and styles of learning should be facilitated [http://www.educationrevolution.org/history.html]
  
 
<h2>Experts</h2>
 
<h2>Experts</h2>
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Though the number of experts in this area would be far too innumerable to list, I have chosen a couple of examples.
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1. Alan Kay, computer scientist and education theorist: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Kay <br>
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2. Arnold Langberg, Alternative School Founder and Education consultant: http://www.langberg.org/background.html <br>
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3. Wayan Vota, One Laptop Per Child forum founder and lobbyist for technology in education: http://edutechdebate.org/is-ict-in-schools-wasted/wayan-vota-technology-in-schools-is-not-wasted/
  
 
<h2>Web Resources</h2>
 
<h2>Web Resources</h2>
1. Montessouri Method: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montessori_method <br>
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1. Miller, Ron. A Brief History of Alternative Education. http://www.educationrevolution.org/history.html <br>
2. Jean Piaget: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Piaget#Origins <br>
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2. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD): Education for the Future http://www.oecd.org/document/34/0,3343,en_2649_37455_43880354_1_1_1_1,00.html
3. OER Commons: http://www.oercommons.org/
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3. Jean Piaget: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Piaget#Origins <br>
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4. Montessouri Method: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montessori_method <br>
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5. OER Commons: http://www.oercommons.org/

Revision as of 20:50, 10 September 2010