Difference between revisions of "Is there any flexibility in the way the curriculum is structured and taught (alternative teaching methods)?"

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Several Alternative Teaching methodologies have developed, particularly since the 1960's. The emergence of various teaching methodologies roughly correlates with theories of learning - i.e. Behaviorism (learning reinforced by reward or punishment) has dominated much of the curriculum based measurement seen in standard educational models. Constructivism, where the learner is seen as building his/her own concepts based upon prior experiences and understanding has had an influence in 'alternative' teaching styles, where the teacher is seen more as a facilitator, and the student is provided opportunities to learn by solving real-world problems. A few examples of this are self-directed learning, transformational learning, and experiential learning. More recently, the theory of Connectivism has emerged as a theory of learning, where the ability to build relationships and connections is emphasized in learning - this theory also incorporates machine learning into its paradigm. This theory has been coined "a learning theory for the digital age" because of how it incorporates the impact of technology on how we learn today.   
 
Several Alternative Teaching methodologies have developed, particularly since the 1960's. The emergence of various teaching methodologies roughly correlates with theories of learning - i.e. Behaviorism (learning reinforced by reward or punishment) has dominated much of the curriculum based measurement seen in standard educational models. Constructivism, where the learner is seen as building his/her own concepts based upon prior experiences and understanding has had an influence in 'alternative' teaching styles, where the teacher is seen more as a facilitator, and the student is provided opportunities to learn by solving real-world problems. A few examples of this are self-directed learning, transformational learning, and experiential learning. More recently, the theory of Connectivism has emerged as a theory of learning, where the ability to build relationships and connections is emphasized in learning - this theory also incorporates machine learning into its paradigm. This theory has been coined "a learning theory for the digital age" because of how it incorporates the impact of technology on how we learn today.   
  
The origins of many modern century alternative school movements are three European philosopher/educators: Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi, and Friedrich Froebel. In his 1762 book Emile, Rousseau argued that education should follow the child's natural growth rather than the demands of society. Both the Waldorf and Montessori school movements can be traced back to these early ideas. During the late 60s/early 70s in the US, educators were experimenting with alternative education in the US. However, over the past 20 years, more traditional educational models have been dominant. The 1983 report by President Reagan's Commission on Excellence in Education, A Nation at Risk has brought about a high degree of emphasis on standards a push back to traditional educational models. Interest in alternative education is beginning to re-emerge due to a growing recognition that in today's democratic, information-rich society, learning should take place everywhere, and diverse personal interests and styles of learning should be facilitated (Miller).
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For more information, please refer to the Driving Force: [http://scenariothinking.org/wiki/index.php/Tailored_and_Alternative_Learning_Systems Tailored and Alternative Learning Systems]
  
 
References: <br>
 
References: <br>
 
- Learning Theory http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_theory_(education) <br>
 
- Learning Theory http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_theory_(education) <br>
- Miller, Ron. A Brief History of Alternative Education. http://www.educationrevolution.org/history.html <br>
 
 
- Song, Liyan and Hill, Janette. A Conceptual Model for Understanding Self-Directed Learning in Online Environments. http://www.ncolr.org/jiol/issues/PDF/6.1.3.pdf
 
- Song, Liyan and Hill, Janette. A Conceptual Model for Understanding Self-Directed Learning in Online Environments. http://www.ncolr.org/jiol/issues/PDF/6.1.3.pdf

Latest revision as of 21:06, 10 September 2010

Several Alternative Teaching methodologies have developed, particularly since the 1960's. The emergence of various teaching methodologies roughly correlates with theories of learning - i.e. Behaviorism (learning reinforced by reward or punishment) has dominated much of the curriculum based measurement seen in standard educational models. Constructivism, where the learner is seen as building his/her own concepts based upon prior experiences and understanding has had an influence in 'alternative' teaching styles, where the teacher is seen more as a facilitator, and the student is provided opportunities to learn by solving real-world problems. A few examples of this are self-directed learning, transformational learning, and experiential learning. More recently, the theory of Connectivism has emerged as a theory of learning, where the ability to build relationships and connections is emphasized in learning - this theory also incorporates machine learning into its paradigm. This theory has been coined "a learning theory for the digital age" because of how it incorporates the impact of technology on how we learn today.

For more information, please refer to the Driving Force: Tailored and Alternative Learning Systems

References:
- Learning Theory http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_theory_(education)
- Song, Liyan and Hill, Janette. A Conceptual Model for Understanding Self-Directed Learning in Online Environments. http://www.ncolr.org/jiol/issues/PDF/6.1.3.pdf